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At Addiction Treatment Services International (ATSI), each client is treated with compassion and respect. Here, you or your loved one will learn to overcome the disease of addiction, understand why addiction has taken control and, in turn, change life for the better. Why? Because we make long-term recovery possible by advancing standards and practices in the field of substance use disorder treatment.

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How Can I Help My Loved One?

Written by Bethany Winkel on . Posted in Addiction Treatment, Family Topics

file561270689520Many people live for weeks, months, or even years with an addicted loved one. Over this period of time, both the addict and their loved ones will suffer with the irresponsibility, hurt feelings, and anger that are brought on by addiction. Many people in this situation don’t know where to turn, so they continue living in uncertainty and dysfunction. In many cases, it is up to loved ones to step up and talk to their loved one and find help for the family.

The First Step is to Talk to Your Loved One

There are many reasons a family member or close friend will avoid confronting their loved one about addiction. Sometimes they are afraid of what the person will say or how it will affect their relationship. Other times they have seen loved ones get shot down when they confronted the addict and don’t want to have the same thing happen to them. Still others are unsure of what to say or how to even help the addict.

The first step toward helping your addicted loved one is to talk to them. Be honest and loving, and tell your loved one how their addiction is impacting those around them, including yourself. Tell them that you are willing to do whatever you can to help, but that you want them to get treatment for their addiction.

Consider an Intervention

If your loved one will not listen to you or other family members and friends, you need to take it one step further. Contact a treatment facility that can help you with intervention services. This will allow you and your family to talk to your loved one in a constructive, positive way, in the hopes that they will see their need for treatment. Visit the National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dependence (NCADD) website for more intervention information.

Help Yourself

If your loved one still will not listen, make sure you get help for yourself. Find a support group, counselor, or doctor that can help you with any depression or anxiety you have because of living with someone with an addiction, and to learn the best way to interact with your loved one.

In general, when interacting with an addicted love one, remember to always:

  • Set boundaries
  • Be loving
  • Protect yourself

 

D.A.R.E. New Jersey Faces New Challenges

Written by Bethany Winkel on . Posted in Family Topics, Government/Law, Health and Lifestyle, Illicit Drugs, Rehab and Treatment News

dareThe well-known D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program which educates students about the dangers of drug abuse, will soon be replaced in New Jersey. The new program, called L.E.A.D. (Law Enforcement Against Drugs), has been established to teach the same curriculum as New Jersey D.A.R.E., a curriculum that has been retired by the national D.A.R.E. organization.

The new program is being instated after months of litigation over which curriculum to use, with New Jersey D.A.R.E. preferring the old curriculum (“Too Good for Drugs”) and the national D.A.R.E. insisting all its chapters use the new curriculum (“Keepin’ It Real”).

D.A.R.E. has faced its share of problems in recent years, with many arguing that its program is ineffective at preventing teen drug use. However, officials hope that L.E.A.D. will help the community address the issue of drug abuse among young people. “L.E.A.D. was started by a bunch of police chiefs and school superintendents in New Jersey to address the academic needs and comprehensive needs of drug prevention in the state,” said Nick DeMauro, who is currently the executive director of L.E.A.D., but previously served as the CEO of D.A.R.E. NJ for 17 years. “We have to educate our children, youth and residents, as much as we can. It should encompass everything from alcohol, tobacco and other drugs.”

Read more about the story here

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Why Teens Abuse Drugs and Alcohol

Written by Bethany Winkel on . Posted in Family Topics

file0001337084503Many parents are caught off-guard by their teen’s drug or alcohol use. They might have higher hopes for their child than a life of addiction, they might not understand the pressures their teen faces, or they might simply not put any thought into how to keep their child drug and alcohol free. It is important for parents to understand the dangers of substance use among teens and know why teens abuse drugs or alcohol in the first place. This will allow parents to have educated conversations with their teen and pre-teen about how to avoid substance use.

Bad Influences

There are a variety of reasons teens try drugs or alcohol. One of the most common reasons is they are influenced by other people. They might be pressured by friends to go along with the cool kids or risk facing ridicule by classmates. They might see their parents’ drug or alcohol use and think it is a normal way to live.

Media

Other teens are highly influenced by things like popular media. They see people in movies and on TV getting high or binge drinking and model their behavior after what they see on the screen. Things like magazines, songs, and even social media sites often glamorize substance use, making teens more susceptible to trying it themselves.

Boredom

Some adolescents use drugs or alcohol simply because they are bored. They might be left unsupervised for long periods of time, especially after school or during the summer months. They might not be able to find anything constructive to do, and start to find dangerous behavior to pass the time.

To Feel Better

Another common reason for teen drug or alcohol abuse is to self-medicate. Many teens struggle with depression and self-loathing, and substances make them feel happier. They might feel better about themselves, have more friendships, and not feel the stress of family life when they are under the influence. Using substances might bolster their confidence and make it easier for them to interact comfortably with others.

Whatever the reason for teen drug or alcohol abuse, substance abuse is never a good answer. While drugs or alcohol might meet a specific need for the moment, before long the teen will become addicted and will face many more troubles.

Drugfree.org has many resources for parents looking for more information about things that might lead their teen to use drugs or alcohol. Parents should familiarize themselves with the temptations their teens face, and learn how to talk to their child about the dangers of drug or alcohol use.

What Should Parents Do if they Suspect Prescription Drug Abuse?

Written by Bethany Winkel on . Posted in Family Topics, Prescription Drugs

file6451245785723Prescription drug abuse is a growing problem in America, and despite warnings, many teens still want to experiment with prescription drugs. As a parent, it is important to learn about the dangers your kids face to use drugs, and then to have meaningful conversations with your pre-teen and teenager about saying no to drugs.

If you suspect your teen is using prescription drugs, talk to your child. Don’t be afraid to be honest about your suspicions or to be firm with your consequences. When necessary, consult a professional to find the treatment program your child needs to recover from the addiction.

Parents today have many resources available to them that can help provide information about drug abuse and help for the treatment of addiction. Below is some good advice for parents of teens that want to help their child stay drug-free (RxSafetyMatters.org).

What can you do as a parent?

  • Educate yourself – know the signs & symptoms of prescription drug abuse
  • Be more aware
  • Keep medications in safe place
  • Monitor your medications – use a Medicine Inventory Sheet
  • Dispose of old or unused medications properly
  • Spread the word – know what community resources you have available
  • Spend time with your teen and get to know their friends and their friends’ parents
  • Reinforce positive behaviors
  • Be aware of online activity
  • Most importantly – Talk to your Children!
  • If you know or suspect that your child is abusing drugs, find out what you can do to intervene

 

Spending Time as a Family Can Prevent Substance Abuse

Written by Bethany Winkel on . Posted in Family Topics

file0001308748464Parents who interact with their children in a positive way can help keep their adolescent from using drugs and alcohol. Several New Jersey communities are finding ways to encourage parents to spend time every day with their children, and to use their influence to help their teens stay away from substance abuse.

According to a New Jersey study, kids who communicate regularly with their parents about their daily activities are 67 percent less likely to be involved in substance abuse than children who have little or no communication (2000 PDFNJ Middle School Study on Substance Use). Eating dinner together is a great way to interact as a family, but there are many other ways that are also effective. Parents should look for ways to spend time together as a family that focus on building healthy relationships. This might include going to special events through school or the recreation department, doing some volunteer work, or just taking an evening walk around the neighborhood.

15-Minute Child Break

The Partnership for a Drug-Free New Jersey has created a “15-Minute Child Break” program that is being used throughout the state. The program consists of an interactive, one-hour presentation for parents and other adults who want to learn about the dangers of substance abuse. Topics in the presentation include:

  • Talking to Your Kids about Drugs and Alcohol
  • Influence of Media and Pop Culture
  • Effects of Specific Drugs
  • Keeping Your Kids Drug-Free
  • Strengthening Parenting Skills
  • Utilizing Teachable Moments

Through this program, parents are “empowered and supported with the assurance that, even in today’s society, they are still the strongest influence in their children’s lives.” If you are a parent, don’t be afraid to talk to your child about the dangers of drugs or alcohol. Take every opportunity you can to be that positive influence on your child’s life.

The Partnership’s 15-Minute Child Break is being presented at several libraries, schools, and community centers throughout New Jersey. Visit the website for more information.

The Problem with Co-Dependency

Written by Bethany Winkel on . Posted in Addiction Treatment, Family Topics

file0001885763700 (2)Co-dependency is often called “relationship addiction.” It can happen with all different types of relationships, but most often occurs with someone who is dependent on drugs or alcohol. According to Mental Health America, co-dependent people have low self-esteem and look for anything outside of themselves to make them feel better. They find it hard to “be themselves.” Some try to feel better through alcohol, drugs or nicotine – and become addicted. Others may develop compulsive behaviors like workaholism, gambling, or indiscriminate sexual activity.

Co-dependence is a form of dysfunction in a relationship, and not only does it not help the person who is struggling with addiction, but it also causes emotional and psychological stress on the co-dependent.

Mental Health America is one resource for those struggling with co-dependency. They have a questionnaire to identify signs of co-dependency, for those who might be at risk. Visit their website to learn more.

Questionnaire To Identify Signs Of Co-dependency (Mental Health America)

This condition appears to run in different degrees, whereby the intensity of symptoms are on a spectrum of severity, as opposed to an all or nothing scale. Please note that only a qualified professional can make a diagnosis of co-dependency; not everyone experiencing these symptoms suffers from co-dependency.

  1. Do you keep quiet to avoid arguments?
    2. Are you always worried about others’ opinions of you?
    3. Have you ever lived with someone with an alcohol or drug problem?
    4. Have you ever lived with someone who hits or belittles you?
    5. Are the opinions of others more important than your own?
    6. Do you have difficulty adjusting to changes at work or home?
    7. Do you feel rejected when significant others spend time with friends?
    8. Do you doubt your ability to be who you want to be?
    9. Are you uncomfortable expressing your true feelings to others?
    10. Have you ever felt inadequate?
    11. Do you feel like a “bad person” when you make a mistake?
    12. Do you have difficulty taking compliments or gifts?
    13. Do you feel humiliation when your child or spouse makes a mistake?
    14. Do you think people in your life would go downhill without your constant efforts?
    15. Do you frequently wish someone could help you get things done?
    16. Do you have difficulty talking to people in authority, such as the police or your boss?
    17. Are you confused about who you are or where you are going with your life?
    18. Do you have trouble saying “no” when asked for help?
    19. Do you have trouble asking for help?
    20. Do you have so many things going at once that you can’t do justice to any of them?

A Parent’s Struggle

Written by Bethany Winkel on . Posted in Family Topics

file000410135465Drug addiction and alcoholism can take a toll on many more lives than just the addict’s. Parents struggle with guilt, shame, and helplessness when their child is an addict. Parents of addicts need help and support as well, to learn how to interact with their child without nagging or enabling them, and to heal their own wounds.

Read CNN’s story here about several parents that faced these struggles and how they reacted to their child’s drug or alcohol abuse.

Are You Helping or Hurting Your Addicted Loved One?

Written by Bethany Winkel on . Posted in Addiction Treatment, Family Topics

file0001885763700 (1)When you have a loved one who is hurting, you want to help them. When you have a loved one who has a problem that could get them in trouble or cause embarrassment, you want to help them avoid those consequences. People who have a family member or close friend that struggles with drug or alcohol addiction often do what they feel is helping the person, but their actions might actually be hurting.

Are you helping or hurting your addicted loved one? There is one question that can help you find out. Ask yourself if your actions are allowing your loved one to stay in their addiction. If the answer is yes, you could be hurting your loved one, despite your best intentions.

If, by your actions, you are taking away the natural consequences of a person’s addiction, you are allowing that person to continue in the addiction. For example, if your loved one has stayed out drinking all night again and is too drunk or hung-over to go to work, and you call in and make an excuse to the boss, you are enabling your loved one to do that again and again. If you give your family member money to cover rent because they’ve spent it all on drugs again, you are enabling them to buy more drugs, knowing you’ll help them next time too.

Enabling tells the addict that recovery from their addiction is not as important as keeping their life together or avoiding embarrassment. It sends the message that you are more concerned with their reputation or trying to keep a sense of normalcy than doing whatever it takes to get them the help they need.

There is a fine line between helping someone and enabling them to remain in their addiction, but it is important for the person’s long term wellbeing that loved ones do all they can to help them find and accept help.

To learn how to interact with your loved one in a way that will help them, visit NIDA’s website.

How to Stop Enabling

Written by Bethany Winkel on . Posted in Addiction Treatment, Family Topics

To enable an addict means to make it easy for them to continue in their addiction. When someone enables an addict, they take away the consequences of the addict’s behavior, allowing the person to continue using without incentive to stop. Enabling can be very detrimental, not only to the addict, but to the enabler as well.

Are You an Enabler?

One of the first questions a family member or close friend of an addict needs to ask themselves is, “Am I an enabler?” Enabling is very common because it is hard to watch someone we care about suffer and run their lives into the ground. Someone who is losing control to an addiction will start to slip, and might become irresponsible with their job, miss important appointments, and spend money carelessly. In order to protect the person, we naturally want to take on the responsibility, to cover for the person, and to help take away the natural consequences of their actions. Enabling usually starts off as genuine concern for the person and a well-intentioned attempt to save them from themselves.

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Darlene Lancer, warns of the danger that enabling can pose for the enabler, or the codependent in the relationship. “Enabling has implications for all codependents, because they generally sacrifice themselves to accommodate others’ needs, solve others’ problems, and assume more than their share of responsibility at work and in relationships.”

But experts warn that this only makes the problem worse, and helps the addict put off getting the help they truly need. If the addict does not have to worry that they miss family gatherings, that the job and all the money are gone, or that they got so wasted that they lost consciousness the night before, they will not see a need to get treatment. However, if the person wakes up and comes to his senses after a night of drugs or drinking and sees all the things he messed up, he might want to do all he can to keep that from happening again.

Stop Enabling

Putting an end to enabling is difficult, and takes hard work and a strong determination to do so. Some tips on how to stop enabling include:

  • Do not do anything for the addict that they can do for themselves
  • Stop lying and covering up for the addict
  • Do not give money to the addict
  • Do not take on extra responsibilities for the addict
  • Set boundaries, and keep them

Families of addicts often need professional help just to get past the issue of enabling. Just as the addiction took time to develop to a certain point, so the act of enabling can develop slowly over time. Sometimes the enabler actually hinders the recovery process because of the unhealthy relationship they have become accustomed to.

Lancer goes on to give this advice, “Stopping enabling isn’t easy. Nor is it for the faint of heart. Aside from likely pushback and possible retaliation, you may also fear the consequences of doing nothing. You may have to weigh the consequences of experiencing short-term pain vs. long-term misery, which postpones the addict’s reckoning with his or her own behavior. It requires great faith and courage not to enable without knowing the outcome.”

When a person stops enabling, it does not mean that the addiction will automatically go away. In fact, many addicts will continue to live with their disease for the rest of their lives. In these cases, it is still important for the family and loved ones to get help for themselves, so that they can live a happy, healthy life, independent of another person’s actions.

Emerging Drug Trends in 2014

Written by ATSI Admin on . Posted in Addiction Treatment, Family Topics, Illicit Drugs, New Drugs, Rehab and Treatment News, Research and Studies

Recently the Regional Organized Crime Information Center released a report that we think will be helpful for parents, law enforcement, the medical community and others who need to be educated about drug abuse. It does a great job of covering what is newly emergent – legal drugs, spices, and synthetics. And also covering the drugs we have been battling for years – opiates, methamphetamine, and other stimulants and depressants.

Here is the entire report in PDF Format: Emerging-drugs-2014_(2) (1)

Below is a reference list of drugs the report covers:

Opioids

Zohydro

A powerful new prescription painkiller known as Zohydro ER hit the market in March 2014 amidst widespread concern that the drug could trigger a disastrous spike in overdoses and deaths. Zohydro is a potent extended-release formulation of hydrocodone without the additives of aspirin or acetaminophen and without anti-abuse formulation.

A powerful new prescription painkiller known as Zohydro ER hit the market in March 2014 amidst widespread concern that the drug could trigger a disastrous spike in overdoses and deaths. Zohydro is a potent extended-release formulation of hydrocodone without the additives of aspirin or acetaminophen and without anti-abuse formulation.

Acetyl Fentanyl

Fentanyl is a prescription narcotic used to relieve severe or chronic pain, commonly used for cancer patients or as a last-resort pain medication. It’s available as a skin patch, lozenge, pill, shot, and a dissolvable film strip. As a recreational street drug, fentanyl may be referred to as China White.

Fentanyl is a prescription narcoticused to relieve severe or chronicpain, commonly used for cancer patientsor as a last-resort pain medication.It’s available as a skin patch,lozenge, pill, shot, and a dissolvablefilm strip. As a recreational streetdrug, fentanyl may be referred to asChina White.

Tramadol

Tramadol is a Schedule IV opioid analgesic used to treat pain, similar to codeine. Recreational use can be dangerous due to the possibility of convulsions with higher doses. When taken orally, rather than injected, it produces opiate-like effects similar to oxycodone. Tramadol costs $1-2 for a 50mg tablet on the street.

Tramadol is a Schedule IV opioid analgesic used to treat pain, similar to codeine. Recreational use can be dangerous due to the possibility of convulsions with higher doses. When taken orally, rather than injected, it produces opiate-like effects similar to oxycodone. Tramadol costs $1-2 for a 50mg tablet on the street.

Methadone

More than 15,500 people die every year of prescription drug overdoses, and nearly one-third of those overdoses involve methadone, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Methadone has been used for decades to treat drug addiction, but in recent years it has been prescribed to relieve pain.

More than 15,500 people die every year of prescription drug overdoses, and nearly one-third of those overdoses involve methadone, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Methadone has been used for decades to treat drug addiction, but in recent years it has been prescribed to relieve pain.

Suboxone

Similar to methadone, Suboxone is used to treat drug addiction and is sometimes prescribed for chronic pain management. In 2012, Suboxone generated $1.55 billion in sales in the United States, surpassing well-known medications like Viagra and Adderall. Its success was partly fueled by the nationwide opioid-abuse epidemic.

Similar to methadone, Suboxone is used to treat drug addiction and is sometimes prescribed for chronic pain management. In 2012, Suboxone generated $1.55 billion in sales in the United States, surpassing well-known medications like Viagra and Adderall. Its success was partly fueled by the nationwide opioid-abuse epidemic.

Opiates of Abuse

Heroin

Heroin was synthesized in 1874 in Germany by mixing morphine with two types of acids. Twenty three years later, Bayer pharmaceutical company claimed to have originated heroin while trying to produce codeine. The company marketed heroin as a “miracle drug,” more effective than codeine as a cough medicine and better than morphine as a pain killer. In 1913, the number of heroin addicts began to skyrocket and heroin became banned in many countries.

Heroin was synthesized in 1874 in Germany by mixing morphine with two types of acids. Twenty three years later, Bayer pharmaceutical company claimed to have originated heroin while trying to produce codeine. The company marketed heroin as a “miracle drug,” more effective than codeine as a cough medicine and better than morphine as a pain killer. In 1913, the number of heroin addicts began to skyrocket and heroin became banned in many countries.

Purple Drank

Purple Drank or Lean, a mixture of Sprite, Jolly Ranchers, and codeine, is consumed by youth. If prescription codeine is unavailable, DM cough syrup is often substituted.

Purple Drank or Lean, a mixture of Sprite, Jolly Ranchers, and codeine, is consumed by youth. If prescription codeine is unavailable, DM cough syrup is often substituted.

Lemon Drop
Lemon drop is a homemade hallucinogenic drug produced by mixing a painter’s solvent(Naphtha) with over-the-counter drugs, such as Robitussin cough syrup, Sucrets, or Vicks Formula 44. Lighter fluid can be used to replace Naptha but is usually not preferred due to bad aftertaste.

Krokodil

Desomorphine is another drug replacing heroin, and is the main ingredient in Krokodil, aka the zombie drug. Krokodil is the street name of a synthetic heroin product that’s extremely popular in Russia, aka Crocodile. It is used by injection; however, it rots the flesh around injections, turns the flesh grey, green, and scaly until the skin peels away and the bone is exposed – leading to amputated limbs and death. Krokodil addicts’ life expectancy runs one to three years once they start on the drug.

Desomorphine is another drug replacing heroin, and is the main ingredient in Krokodil, aka the zombie drug. Krokodil is the street name of a synthetic heroin product that’s extremely popular in Russia, aka Crocodile. It is used by injection; however, it rots the flesh around injections, turns the flesh grey, green, and scaly until the skin peels away and the bone is exposed – leading to amputated limbs and death. Krokodil addicts’ life expectancy runs one to three years once they start on the drug.

Synthetic Cathinones and Other Designer Drugs

Bath Salts

Bath salts are typically a white or brown crystalline powder sold in small plastic or foil packages labeled “not for human consumption.” They are sometimes marketed as plant food, jewelry cleaner, or phone screen cleaner, and are sold online and in drug paraphernalia stores under a variety of names, including Ivory Wave, Cloud Nine, Lunar Wave, Vanilla Sky, White Lightning, and Scarface.

Bath salts are typically a white or brown crystalline powder sold in small plastic or foil packages labeled “not for human consumption.” They are sometimes marketed as plant food, jewelry cleaner, or phone screen cleaner, and are sold online and in drug paraphernalia stores under a variety of names, including Ivory Wave, Cloud Nine, Lunar Wave, Vanilla Sky, White Lightning, and Scarface.

Gravel

Gravel is a highly addictive form of synthetic cathinone. Its primary component, alpha-PVP, is often used in combination with other drugs. Seizures of the drug have been found to contain methamphetamine, Klonopin, and bath salts.

Gravel is a highly addictive form of synthetic cathinone. Its primary component, alpha-PVP, is often used in combination with other drugs. Seizures of the drug have been found to contain methamphetamine, Klonopin, and bath salts.

Pump-It Powder

As the chemicals in synthetic drugs are designated controlled substances, chemists are actively inventing new compounds to circumvent legal restrictions. One such product that has replaced bath salts is Pump-It Powder, marketed as an enhanced plant vitamin.

As the chemicals in synthetic drugs are designated controlled substances, chemists are actively inventing new compounds to circumvent legal restrictions. One such product that has replaced bath salts is Pump-It Powder, marketed as an enhanced plant vitamin.

MXE

Methoxetamine or MXE is a new designer “research chemical product” often taken for its hallucinogenic and dissociative effects and is relatively new to the recreational drug culture in the United States. MXE is considered to be an analog to the drug Ketamine, classified as a dissociative anesthetic originally used as a powerful tranquilizer on animals. The packaging reads “research chemical” and “not for human consumption.”

Methoxetamine or MXE is a new designer “research chemical product” often taken for its hallucinogenic and dissociative effects and is relatively new to the recreational drug culture in the United States. MXE is considered to be an analog to the drug Ketamine, classified as a dissociative anesthetic originally used as a powerful tranquilizer on animals. The packaging reads “research chemical” and “not for human consumption.”

Cannabis and Synthetic Cannabinoids

Spice

Spice is a mixture of herbs combined with synthetic cannabinoids that produce a high similar to marijuana. Spice may refer to the actual dominant brand of synthetic marijuana but is generally used to describe all herbal blends with synthetic cannabinoids added. It is often marked as herbal incense; however, some brands market their product as herbal smoking blends.

Spice is a mixture of herbs combined with synthetic cannabinoids that produce a high similar to marijuana. Spice may refer to the actual dominant brand of synthetic marijuana but is generally used to describe all herbal blends with synthetic cannabinoids added. It is often marked as herbal incense; however, some brands market their product as herbal smoking blends.

Dabs (BHO)

A highly concentrated version of THC known as Butane Hash Oil, Dabs, or Wax is made using highly explosive butane. A clear, golden-brown cannabis derivative, BHO has little smell, either in its solid form or when vaporized. It sells on average for $50 a gram. BHO is 15 percent THC, and a drop or two can be as potent as a joint. It is said to be so potent that it will keep a person high for more than a day.

A highly concentrated version of THC known as Butane Hash Oil, Dabs, or Wax is made using highly explosive butane. A clear, golden-brown cannabis derivative, BHO has little smell, either in its solid form or when vaporized. It sells on average for $50 a gram. BHO is 15 percent THC, and a drop or two can be as potent as a joint. It is said to be so potent that it will keep a person high for more than a day.

Transdermal THC Patches

State troopers are seeing more marijuana hash-inflused transdermal patches (similar to a nicotine patch) being purchased from Colorado and crossing state lines. Once removed from the package, the patches have no markings. They do have a slight odor of marijuana and easily test positive for THC.

State troopers are seeing more marijuana hash-inflused transdermal patches (similar to a nicotine patch) being purchased from Colorado and crossing state lines. Once removed from the package, the patches have no markings. They do have a slight odor of marijuana and easily test positive for THC.

THC Puppy Chow

Puppy chow is a common party food made by melting chocolate and butter and combining it with powder sugar and Chex cereal. The THC oil is added to the butter during the cooking process. Users are also mixing the THC oil with Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal.

Puppy chow is a common party food made by melting chocolate and butter and combining it with powder sugar and Chex cereal. The THC oil is added to the butter during the cooking process. Users are also mixing the THC oil with Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal.

Phenethylamines

Molly

Sometime in the past decade, Ecstasy returned to clubs as Molly, a powder or crystalline form of MDMA that implied greater purity and safety: Ecstasy re-branded as a gentler, more approachable drug. And thanks in part to that new moniker, MDMA has found a new following in a generation of conscientious professionals who have never been to a rave and who are known for making careful choices in regard to their food, coffee, and clothing.

Sometime in the past decade, Ecstasy returned to clubs as Molly, a powder or crystalline form of MDMA that implied greater purity and safety: Ecstasy re-branded as a gentler, more approachable drug. And thanks in part to that new moniker, MDMA has found a new following in a generation of conscientious professionals who have never been to a rave and who are known for making careful choices in regard to their food, coffee, and clothing.

2C-I / India

The synthetic drug 2C-I or India is replacing bath salts as the new hallucinogen of choice among teenagers. The drug is derived from phenethylamine. It is sometimes confused with 251-NBOMe, aka Smiles.

Benzo Fury

Benzo Fury is a party drug similar in structure to MDMA and usually taken in pill form. It takes effect within 45 minutes to an hour. Desired effects include euphoria and an energy surge that may last up to ten hours, plateauing at two hours.

Bromo Dragonfly

Bromo Dragonfly is a psychedelic drug related to the phenethylamine family. It is slightly less potent than LSD and 200 times the potency of mescaline with a normal dose of 200 pg to 800 pg. Effects could last several days; however, they may not take effect for up to six hours, leading users to take multiple doses. Bromo Dragonfly is sold in the form of blotters, and is often mistaken for LSD.

N-Bomb

NBOMe is a clump white powder with a notably bitter and metallic taste. It is often sold as LSD or mescaline. It may be snorted, or made into a liquid and soaked into blotter paper (like LSD) or laced on something edible. It is most often taken on breath strips and dissolves quickly in the mouth.

NBOMe is a clump white powder with a notably bitter and metallic taste. It is often sold as LSD or mescaline. It may be snorted, or made into a liquid and soaked into blotter paper (like LSD) or laced on something edible. It is most often taken on breath strips and dissolves quickly in the mouth.

Herbal Drugs of Abuse

Kratom

Kratom is a tropical evergreen tree in the coffee family located in Southeast Asia, particularly Thailand. Its leaves are used for medicinal purposes and produce psychoactive effects when chewed. It may also be drunk like a tea (50 grams of dried kratom leaves boiled in one liter of water). It behaves similar to an opioid such as morphine.

Kratom is a tropical evergreen tree in the coffee family located in Southeast Asia, particularly Thailand. Its leaves are used for medicinal purposes and produce psychoactive effects when chewed. It may also be drunk like a tea (50 grams of dried kratom leaves boiled in one liter of water). It behaves similar to an opioid such as morphine.

Angel’s Trumpets

Angel’s Trumpets, aka moonflowers or daturas, are flowers cultivated in the United States. They are short-lived perennials of various colors. All Datura plants contain tropane alkaloids in their seeds and flowers. Because of these substances, Angel’s Trumpets have been used in some cultures as a poison and a hallucinogen.

Angel’s Trumpets, aka moonflowers or daturas, are flowers cultivated in the United States. They are short-lived perennials of various colors. All Datura plants contain tropane alkaloids in their seeds and flowers. Because of these substances, Angel’s Trumpets have been used in some cultures as a poison and a hallucinogen.

Salvia Divinorum

Salvia Divinorum is a perennial herb in the mint family native to certain areas of Mexico. Salvinorin A is believed to be the responsible ingredient for the plant’s hallucinogenic effects, typically when chewed or smoked.

Salvia Divinorum is a perennial herb in the mint family native to certain areas of Mexico. Salvinorin A is believed to be the responsible ingredient for the plant’s hallucinogenic effects, typically when chewed or smoked.

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